Not getting vaccinated is harmful in more ways than one

Back to Article
Back to Article

Not getting vaccinated is harmful in more ways than one

Kathryn Broderius, Editorialist

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






With flu season in full swing and 61,000 deaths during the 2018-19 season, it is more crucial than ever for people to get vaccinated.

While the flu vaccine is not a hundred percent, guarantee that a person never will get the flu, it decreases the odds greatly. Even though the flu is just one virus, there are many other important preliminary vaccines that should be attained by any individual as a baby and renewed on the set bases for the rest of their life to prevent viruses and disease later in life.

Probably the most sickening idea is that developing countries around the world that do not have vaccines readily available plead for them. Yet in a location like the United States, where most people’s insurance pay for all the expense of them, people still don’t get them.

Unfortunately for many kids, their parents make the initial decision. Infants are not able to make decisions for themselves when it comes to being vaccinated at an early stage in life. What parents do not realize is that the decision on whether or not to be vaccinated, can mean life or death for that child.

Interestingly enough, societies’ ideas on vaccines have shifted since their discovery. Events such as the polio epidemic in the 1940’s left caregivers pleading for a cure to save children’s life. Yet today, with a  vaccine available, parents oppose the option for their child. A simple vaccine can prevent that person from ever having to worry about getting the disease in their lifetime.

Recently a case of measles (rubeola) was reported at the National FFA Convention that exposed large numbers of students to a rapidly spreading illness. A vaccine could have simply prevented this incident from ever occurring.

Even as a health care professional and individual, I will admit that I don’t know many people who enjoy getting stuck in their arm by a needle.  But if it means saving my life and preventing others from getting sick around me, I will take the five seconds of pain and encourage you to do the same.